Dougie’s Monday mailbag

By Doug Fischer

THE BIG AND LITTLE DRAMA SHOWS

Dear Mr Fischer,

While I’m pleased to have spent my Saturday night watching the big and little drama shows, and pleased to have been able to bring three new initiates into the boxing fandom fold, I can’t say that the night was an overwhelming success.

The four of us had a hard time stomaching the results of Roman Gonzales and Srisaket Sor Rungvisai’s fight. None of us, me least of all, could figure out why Steve Willis only had the doctor look at the cuts (plural!) on Chocolatito’s head once, and didn’t do a better job of watching for the clashes. After four rounds, I figured the fight would go the same way as Sor Rungvisai’s loss to Carlos Cuadras and be stopped and sent to the cards (which Chocolatito seemed sure to carry after round 3) well before the championship rounds. The result sits worse for me than Andre Ward’s “win” over Sergey Kovalev, watching Chocolatito’s cutman’s hands shake because of his inability to stop the bleeding (and I assume his care for his fighter) was heartbreaking. The champion deserved better. I will leave the scoring controversy (all the minds in the room with me were as one) to people who understand boxing scoring better than me; I’m more confused the longer I follow the sport.

The Gennady Golovkin-Daniel Jacobs fight was easier to watch, if not what I was expecting. I have to give credit to Andre Rozier, Virgil Hunter, and the rest of Jacob’s team, they had an exceptional fight plan. I do not agree with Jacobs or Rozier that he won the fight, nor do I think that he could “win every round” if he just kept to boxing GGG (something Rozier told him after the knockdown). I saw the fight going the distance after the third round, Jacobs was big and it was clear that he had no plans to engage enough to take meaningful risks (apart from the obviously enormous risk of stepping into the ring with GGG). After 12, we in the room believed that Golovkin had done more than enough to win the fight (with the knockdown providing a cushion for an otherwise close fight), but everyone was hoping for a little more action (I had shown them Golovkin’s fights against Kell Brook, Curtis Stevens, and David Lemieux). Apart from the lack of sustained action, which seemed to take the crowd out of most of the fight, what was the atmosphere inside the Garden? What was your assessment of the fight?

Thanks again for all you do with the mailbags and articles. I hope you had a great weekend and that it didn’t make for too much work (although it’s hard to envy you that, given where some of it occurs). I hope also that this finds you and yours well, and that you are back with your family by the time this mailbag hits the press. I send the very best. Peace. – John

Thanks for the very kind words and for sharing your thoughts on Saturday’s show, John. I compiled this mailbag while waiting for my flight out of New York City at LaGuardia airport and began answering it while waiting for my wife (with kids) to pick me up from LAX. So, yes, the family is good, and yes, I was back home before this edition of the Monday mailbag was published.

Also, thanks for bringing in three boxing fan newbies with Saturday’s pay-per-view card. Hopefully, the sustained action of the junior bantamweight title bout made more of an impression than questionable scoring.

The four of us had a hard time stomaching the results of Roman Gonzales and Srisaket Sor Rungvisai’s fight. That’s probably because you see and think clearly.

None of us, me least of all, could figure out why Steve Willis only had the doctor look at the cuts (plural!) on Chocolatito’s head once, and didn’t do a better job of watching for the clashes. Perhaps ol’ Crazy Eyes just viewed it as an unfortunate byproduct of the fighters’ ultra-aggressiveness and the clash of their orthodox and southpaw stances.

The result sits worse for me than Andre Ward’s “win” over Sergey Kovalev, watching Chocolatito’s cutman’s hands shake because of his inability to stop the bleeding (and I assume his care for his fighter) was heartbreaking. Gonzalez was worked on by a hall-of-fame cutman, Miguel Diaz, between rounds, but alas age has probably caused the veteran cornerman’s hands to betray him.

The champion deserved better. I agree. So did every member of press row that I spoke to after the fight, and the vast majority of the crowd inside MSG.

I will leave the scoring controversy (all the minds in the room with me were as one) to people who understand boxing scoring better than me; I’m more confused the longer I follow the sport. I don’t think anyone who covers or follows pro boxing understands the sport’s scoring anymore. The way it USED to be was the dude who landed the more meaningful punches on a round by round basis was the dude who won the fight if it went to the scorecards, but evidently that’s no longer the case. Gonzalez landed more punches in 10 of the 12 rounds he fought with Sor Rungvisai and even set a junior bantamweight CompuBox record by landing 372 power shots (56.4%) and he STILL somehow lost the fight! Arrrrgh!

The Gennady Golovkin-Daniel Jacobs fight was easier to watch, if not what I was expecting. I’m an unapologetic blood-thirsty ghoul, so Gonzalez-Sor Rungvisai was much easier for me to watch than Golovkin-Jacobs. I appreciated the ring generalship, defense and strategy exhibited by both middleweights but I was waiting for fireworks to explode and all I got was a slow-burning fuse for 12 rounds.

I have to give credit to Andre Rozier, Virgil Hunter, and the rest of Jacob’s team, they had an exceptional fight plan. They did a lot of things right – including coming in as heavy as possible on fight night (and to hell with the IBF), staying off the ropes for much of the bout, switching to southpaw for periods, and going to GGG’s body during the second half of the fight.

Photo / Tom Hogan-HoganPhotos / K2 Promotions

I do not agree with Jacobs or Rozier that he won the fight, nor do I think that he could “win every round” if he just kept to boxing GGG (something Rozier told him after the knockdown). Well, here’s the thing, I’m sure that advice kept Jacobs upright for the next eight rounds, but there’s more to effective “boxing” than lateral movement and an occasional flurry – especially when your guy is getting out-jabbed.

I saw the fight going the distance after the third round, Jacobs was big and it was clear that he had no plans to engage enough to take meaningful risks (apart from the obviously enormous risk of stepping into the ring with GGG). It seemed to me that Jacobs took the game plan of Martin Murray (another very big, very mobile middleweight but not as athletic as the Brooklynite) to another level.

After 12, we in the room believed that Golovkin had done more than enough to win the fight (with the knockdown providing a cushion for an otherwise close fight)… Seems to me that you and your three boxing new-comer guests have better eyes and sensibility than a lot of the self-proclaimed hardcore fans shooting their mouths off on Twitter.

Apart from the lack of sustained action, which seemed to take the crowd out of most of the fight, what was the atmosphere inside the Garden? It was all the way live, John. It was as loud as you’d expect from nearly 20,000 passionate fans and very intense, with enough Jacobs fans to put up counter cheers and chants to the obvious crowd favorite (occasionally boiling over into some unfortunate fist fights in the audience).

What was your assessment of the fight? It was a tactical bout, interesting to watch live but not as entertaining as I’d hoped it would be. I thought Jacobs fought the fight of his life and legitimately won anywhere from four to six rounds, but I do not think he did enough to beat Golovkin, who to my eyes was the ring master that night.

GREAT FIGHTS, BAD DECISIONS

Dougie,

Saturday night was such an amazing night of boxing but I can’t help but feel that the wrong guy won both the co-main event and the main event. Now I’m not stubborn or a person that isn’t up for debate but I truly feel Chocolatito and Daniel Jacobs legitimately had their well earned victory taken away from them.

I am a boxing fan to the max and I was watching the fight with people who I was trying to introduce the sport of boxing at its best to. Fights were enjoyed and people were excited but when decisions were announced even people who don’t know the sport understood that the scores should of been the other way.

I personally had Jacobs winning 8 rounds to 4 with the extra point for GGG for the knockdown but I understand that rounds are close but man I really felt that Jacobs had the victory locked in and GGG needed a knockdown to at least get the draw. How did you score it?

Dougie, idk about you but I really feel HBO commentators are losing their step. Not all of them but def Roy Jones and Jim Lampley. I love hearing Max Kellerman. My dream team of commentators would be Kellerman, Paulie Malignaggi, and a head trainer for every fight. How about you?

Mythical matchups:

Tito Trinidad vs GGG-

Arturo Gatti vs Mayorga-

Shawn Porter vs Maidana-

Thanks a lot for reading my email. I love hearing your opinions on the current boxing world and I will continue to tune in every week to your mailbag. – Juan M

Thanks Juan.

I saw a competitive middleweight fight but recognized Golovkin’s superior jab, defensive prowess and consistent offense, and scored seven rounds to the defending unified beltholder – Rounds 1, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, and 12 – for a 115-112 tally. Jacobs was definitely in the fight. The New Yorker had a 144-126 edge in power shots landed, according to CompuBox, but from my vantage point Golovkin (the more accurate and economical puncher) landed the cleaner power shots between his constant jab (which often landed with head-snapping authority).

I’m OK with judge Max DeLuca’s 114-113 scorecard for Golovkin, but I’m also fine with folks who scored eight rounds for the unbeaten Kazakh (116-111).

I expected some fans and media to score the fight for Jacobs if it went the distance, and I expected debate as to who was the superior “boxer.” There’s always going to be heated debate as to who really won after a style matchup between a strong, busy, come-forward technician and fast, flashy, mobile boxer-puncher.

With the exception of my boyhood idol, Sugar Ray Leonard (against Marvin Hagler 30 years ago), I generally don’t side with the boxer who moves about the ring and gets off in offensive spurts in a close fight against a more offensively consistent hard-punching stalker. I still think Kovalev beat Ward and I still think Badou Jack beat James DeGale.

Dougie, idk about you but I really feel HBO commentators are losing their step. I don’t always agree with Jim, Roy, Max and Harold, but I think they – as well as Showtime’s various boxing broadcast booths – are among the best in the world.

Not all of them but def Roy Jones and Jim Lampley. Roy’s my favorite. Jim’s a broadcast legend.

My dream team of commentators would be Kellerman, Paulie Malignaggi, and a head trainer for every fight. How about you? Nobody currently following the sport will agree with me, but if I could bring back the retired sportscaster Tim Ryan and resurrect hall-of-fame trainer/manager Gil Clancy to do one more show, that old CBS boxing commentator duo would be my dream team.

Your mythical matchups:

Tito Trinidad vs GGG- Golovkin by decision or late stoppage

Arturo Gatti vs Mayorga- Mayorga by late stoppage (probably on cuts)

Shawn Porter vs Maidana- Porter by close but unanimous decision

WHAT’S NEXT FOR GONZALEZ, INOUE?

Hi, Doug!

  1. Gonzalez-Sor Rungvisai was a terrific fight, but I was upset by the outcome: I think Gonzalez won by 115-111.

Still, I cannot call it a robbery since it was legitimately close, and it’s clear that at 115 he isn’t the beast that he used to be at 108/112.

I admire those who move up to fight the best, but sometimes I wish they stayed where they can perform best.

  1. And with Gonzalez defeated, I wonder what Inoue will do next.

Inoue was willing to make a US debut and fight Gonzalez, but probably he won’t be very interested in Sor Rungvisai, who isn’t so popular but is as dangerous as Gonzalez.

If he doesn’t fight the Thai, I want him to move up immediately to 118 and fight Yamanaka before the RING bantamweight king gets too old.

  1. If Inoue leaves 115, the superflyweight division will turn into a chaos.

Sor Rungvisai is very dangerous but beatable, Cuadras didn’t look sharp tonight, Gonzalez seems to have hit the ceiling, and Estrada may not be as effective as he was at 112 too.

Who will emerge as the king of the division?

Mythical matchups:

Salvador Sanchez vs Julio Cesar Chavez at 130 in 1984 — What would have happened to Chavez’s legacy and record if Sanchez hadn’t been killed?

The GGG that fought Jacobs vs the best version of Sergio Martinez at 160

Cheers. – Taku from Japan

I’ll start with your interesting mythical matchups:

Salvador Sanchez vs Julio Cesar Chavez at 130 in 1984 — What would have happened to Chavez’s legacy and record if Sanchez hadn’t been killed? I think Sanchez would have outpointed him in a very close, hotly contested fight, and maybe done so in a rematch that would have shortened the Mexico City native’s career, but I think Chavez still would have gone on to become a legend of the sport.

The GGG that fought Jacobs vs the best version of Sergio Martinez at 160 – I can see the best version of Martinez outworking and outmaneuvering Saturday’s version of Golovkin to a close points win, but my pick would be GGG by late TKO. I think Golovkin’s steady pressure, stiff, well-timed jab, accurate power shots, and Maravilla’s own warrior spirit would get the better of the Argentine southpaw in a very good fight. Unlike Jacobs, who may have been 10-15 pounds heavier than Golovkin, Martinez didn’t have the size to withstand the pressure for 12 rounds.

Gonzalez-Sor Rungvisai was a terrific fight, but I was upset by the outcome: I think Gonzalez won by 115-111. You, my friend, had the correct scorecard (hapless judges and Twitter nerds be damned). Like you, I thought Chocolatito clearly won eight rounds (and with his knockdown and Sor Rungvisai’s point deduction that winds up being a 115-111 tally). It was indeed a terrific fight, a Fight of the Year candidate in my opinion.

Still, I cannot call it a robbery since it was legitimately close, and it’s clear that at 115 he isn’t the beast that he used to be at 108/112. OK, don’t call it a robbery; call it a gift for Sor Rungvisai. Of course, Gonzalez isn’t at his best at 115 pounds. He began his career at 105 pounds and he’s had a lot of hard championship fights over the past eight and half years. But the fact that he doesn’t dominate as much at 115 as he did the lighter divisions does not negate the fact that he soundly outworked, out-jabbed, outslugged and out-landed the Thai challenger.

I admire those who move up to fight the best, but sometimes I wish they stayed where they can perform best. Had Gonzalez stayed at 112, or immediately returned to flyweight after beating Cuadras, you know as well as I do that all those hardcore nutcakes hanging out there in comment sections and the Twitterverse would claim he’s avoiding your boy Inoue and a rematch with Principe.

I wonder what Inoue will do next? Inoue was willing to make a US debut and fight Gonzalez, but probably he won’t be very interested in Sor Rungvisai, who isn’t so popular but is as dangerous as Gonzalez. Hey, Inoue doesn’t lack confidence. Sor Rungvisai has the WBC belt, which holds a lot of weight in Japan, and there’s a Japan-Thailand rivalry that exists. I can see Inoue going for WBO-WBC title unification bout, or allowing Gonzalez to try to avenge his loss and then taking on the winner of the rematch.

If he doesn’t fight the Thai, I want him to move up immediately to 118 and fight Yamanaka before the RING bantamweight king gets too old. That’s a passing-of-the-torch match that I’d love to see. It would be the first time an all-Japanese matchup up was between two pound-for-pound rated fighters with a RING title on the line.

If Inoue leaves 115, the super flyweight division will turn into a chaos.

Sor Rungvisai is very dangerous but beatable, Cuadras didn’t look sharp tonight, Gonzalez seems to have hit the ceiling, and Estrada may not be as effective as he was at 112 too. Yeah, but you know what? No matter how you match them up among themselves, they make for BADASS fights, so I don’t care. If Inoue stays at 115, all the better.

Who will emerge as the king of the division? I gotta favor Inoue if he sticks around. The Monster has size, youth and natural talent on his side.

GGG’S RAZOR-THIN WIN

Hey Dougie,

Hope you had a great time in NYC. Both fights were close but one had the wrong winner.

First let’s start with GGG, I thought he did enough to win 6 to 7 rounds, felt he let go several rounds looking for openings to try to keep the KO streak alive. If he hadn’t done that and kept throwing he jab and body shots he would’ve made it much easier on himself.

I give Danny Jacobs a lot of credit because he came very close in unseating the middleweight champ. It’s obvious a lot of GGG haters and Canelo lovers are going to cry robbery and that’s OK, it was close, it’s part of how social media works, but let’s be honest, there was only one man that seemed to be hurt by the other guy’s punches, and that was Jacobs.

Man, GGG has a chin doesn’t he? Every time GGG landed flush you could see that Jacobs felt it. There’s a reason one man hit the deck and the other didn’t.

Now, Chocolatito… man it was sad seeing his unbeaten record go in a fight like this where he did everything a human being can do to fight against all sorts of adversity. To me he’s still the best boxing machine in the business and the only reason he’s going to lose legitimately is because of size not skill.

Overall a good card. Worth the money as always. I do see these two warriors losing soon as Father Time is creeping up on them. Still my two favorite fighters currently (not Lomachenko as HBO wants me to believe). Safe trip. – Juan Valverde

I had a safe trip to and from NYC and a great time (as always) while I was there (I didn’t even mind the cold weather or all the drunk St. Patrick’s Day celebrators).

Age/wear and tear has indeed begun to take a toll on the Dynamic Duo but they remain the best one-two punch in boxing in terms of entertainment value and live in-arena experience. And they remain masters of their craft. Golovkin’s ring generalship is not appreciated or recognized by all, but it’s amazing, and Chocolatito’s high-volume body-head combination attack is absolutely awe inspiring – especially when you take into consideration that he’s in his fourth weight class with 16 world title bouts under his belt.

First let’s start with GGG, I thought he did enough to win 6 to 7 rounds, felt he let go several rounds looking for openings to try to keep the KO streak alive. I agree, but I’m going to give Jacobs credit for neutralizing GGG’s aggression to an extent with lateral movement and sporadic offense that kept the defending titleholder on his toes and always ready to take a step back.

If he hadn’t done that and kept throwing he jab and body shots he would’ve made it much easier on himself. Golovkin definitely needed to go to the body more than he did.

I give Danny Jacobs a lot of credit because he came very close in unseating the middleweight champ. He fought an excellent fight and game plan, and he really dug deep. Jacobs and his team – which obviously had a great training camp – should be proud of the effort he put forth on Saturday.

It’s obvious a lot of GGG haters and Canelo lovers are going to cry robbery and that’s OK, it was close, it’s part of how social media works, but let’s be honest, there was only one man that seemed to be hurt by the other guy’s punches, and that was Jacobs. That’s what I saw from my seat on press row, but other writers (who were closer to the ring) believe that they saw Jacobs buzz or stun Golovkin more than a few times. As for the GGG haters (and the Canelo lovers – although I don’t hear much from them), they can bring it on social media, I’ve got something for their stankin’ asses. I’m dishin’ out grief all week and I hope the replay of the fight pisses them off even more.

Man, GGG has a chin doesn’t he? Arguably the best in the sport.

Photo / Tom Hogan-HoganPhotos / K2 Promotions

Now, Chocolatito… man it was sad seeing his unbeaten record go in a fight like this where he did everything a human being can do to fight against all sorts of adversity. Yeah, that decision sucked in my opinion, but my hat is off to Sor Rungvisai. That little Thai warrior came to die on Saturday. He took shots that he shouldn’t have been able to absorb, but his mind and will and spirit were so strong he fought through Gonzalez’s punch storm.

To me he’s still the best boxing machine in the business and the only reason he’s going to lose legitimately is because of size not skill. Agreed. His heart/will/spirit is just as strong as Sor Rungvisai’s, and NOBODY can outwork him.

SCORING SHENANIGANS & ONLINE PPVS

Dougie!

What is up? Hoping to make the mailbag with some of my thoughts on the solid if unspectacular GGG vs. Jacobs PPV. I’ll try to be concise with my points.

  1. I thought Chocolatito clearly beat Sor Rungvisai, by 2 or 3 rounds. Several times I thought he was close to stopping the little Thai badass with the iron chin, but somehow he was able to stay on his feet. However, I was physically sick, then seething with rage, when the scores were read and we somehow had a new champion. Bad judging just has to stop. It ruined what was a wonderful fight with a bad decision. I can’t imagine how it feels to gut through the awful cuts and early knockdown Choco dealt with to be robbed. Boxing needs to do better.
  1. I thought Jacobs did a good job of making things hard for GGG, but I also thought GGG won the fight clearly. I had it 115-112 for Golovkin. I don’t know about the speculation that GGG is getting old or that he looked bad. I think it was more that he was fighting the 2nd best middleweight in world, dressed in a cruiserweight costume(180+ in the ring), and his usually withering power shots didn’t have the same effect. However, every jab seemed to snap Jacobs head back, Jacobs missed a ton, was hurt often, and boxing is scored on clean punching first and foremost. Also, GGG stalked Jacobs like he does most opponents, which gives him ring generalship, but Jacobs tied him up effectively and used his size, speed and boxing ability to go the distance. A moral victory for Jacobs, but a clear GGG win. Some fans just give fighters too much credit for fleeing the action and not landing punches. I thought Jacobs, to his credit, had some success trading with GGG and definitely was very competitive when he actually stood toe to toe and looked to brawl. Maybe he should put on his big boy pants and come to fight in an eventual rematch? Either way, I’m gonna catch his next fight, and hope its not 18 months from now.
  1. Can we please get more PPVs available online? The ringtv.com stream had some hiccups at first, but by the middle of the Cuadras fight the stream was smooth and clear, and the international broadcast team did a good job. Boxing needs to get with the times. The next step is a great app, like the UFC one, that offers an all boxing sub service along with PPV, and to get as many promoters on it as you can. I’d gladly pay for access to non PPV cards, big and small, and the ability to buy legit PPV’s without getting raped by the cable company. Get your ringtv nerds working on that ASAP. Will the Canelo-Chavez fight be available online at least?

I’ll just close with 2 questions:

  1. Where should Chocolatito go next? I’m saying he should take the big money Inoue fight before his body gives out on him after all these hellacious wars.
  1. What do you think of GGG’s performance? Do you think this changes how a BJS or Canelo fight would play out?

Thanks for the mailbags and for fighting the good fight against the dummygraphic on social media! Keep that block button handy… – Tom, PA

Oh I don’t block right away, my man. I like to engage a bit, definitely more so than we saw with GGG and Danny, but maybe not as much as Chocolatito and Sor Rungvisai. I think I’m going to use this week as an excuse to unfollow any idiotic fans that I follow for no particular reason, and I’ll probably use the MUTE button more than the BLOCK. That MUTE function is like a good jab among young prospects – underused.

  1. Where should Chocolatito go next? I’m saying he should take the big money Inoue fight before his body gives out on him after all these hellacious wars. I’ve read where Gonzalez wants an immediate rematch with Sor Rungvisai and I think he has a right to try to regain his title after suffering what most viewed as a controversial decision loss. If Inoue were suddenly challenge Gonzalez and record money was put up for that fight, maybe that’s a course that Choco would take, but I don’t see that happening any time soon.
  1. What do you think of GGG’s performance? Solid, effective but unspectacular.

Do you think this changes how a BJS or Canelo fight would play out? No, but it changes the way many will view those potential matchups (especially the Canelo showdown).

I thought Chocolatito clearly beat Sor Rungvisai, by 2 or 3 rounds. That’s because you’re not blind.

Photo by Tom Hogan – Hoganphotos/K2 Promotions

Several times I thought he was close to stopping the little Thai badass with the iron chin, but somehow he was able to stay on his feet. Thai challengers are seldom victorious here in the U.S. but they’re usually uncommonly durable and well-conditioned. Now that I think about it, Sor Rungvisai’s victory Saturday night has to be the biggest Thai upset on U.S. soil since Saman Sorjaturong stopped Humberto “Chiquita” Gonzalez at The Forum in Inglewood, California back in 1995 (and I was at that fight – as a fan!).

Bad judging just has to stop. It ruined what was a wonderful fight with a bad decision. I can’t imagine how it feels to gut through the awful cuts and early knockdown Choco dealt with to be robbed. Boxing needs to do better. I agree. I think Glenn Feldman, Julie Lederman and Waleska Roldan had a bad night at the office.

I thought Jacobs did a good job of making things hard for GGG, but I also thought GGG won the fight clearly. I had it 115-112 for Golovkin. Same here.

I don’t know about the speculation that GGG is getting old or that he looked bad. I think it was more that he was fighting the 2nd best middleweight in world, dressed in a cruiserweight costume (180+ in the ring), and his usually withering power shots didn’t have the same effect. I agree. To say Golovkin is suddenly “old” or that he had a bad night takes away from Jacobs’ fine performance as well as his stature within the sport.

However, every jab seemed to snap Jacobs head back, Jacobs missed a ton, was hurt often, and boxing is scored on clean punching first and foremost. That’s what I saw. I saw Jacobs nail Golovkin with some solid shots, but I also witnessed him miss a lot and land a lot of punches on GGG’s gloves and arms (and I thought his technique fell off as his activity grew in the later rounds).

Also, GGG stalked Jacobs like he does most opponents, which gives him ring generalship, but Jacobs tied him up effectively and used his size, speed and boxing ability to go the distance. I didn’t give Golovkin credit for merely stalking forward, I gave him credit for quickly finding range with his jab and landing it consistently all night (without getting tagged too much in return). I didn’t care much for Jacobs’ holding tactics but it was effective in that it prevented Golovkin from getting off inside and also seemed to frustrate the odds/media favorite.

A moral victory for Jacobs, but a clear GGG win. Absolutely. Both middleweights should be proud of going the 12-round distance in a closely contested fight.

Some fans just give fighters too much credit for fleeing the action and not landing punches. Not me.

I thought Jacobs, to his credit, had some success trading with GGG and definitely was very competitive when he actually stood toe to toe and looked to brawl. I agree. If he had started earlier or stood his ground more down the stretch maybe he could have won it on the official cards.

Maybe he should put on his big boy pants and come to fight in an eventual rematch? Aw, come on, man, don’t be mean to Danny!

Either way, I’m gonna catch his next fight, and hope it’s not 18 months from now. Jacobs’ adviser and management team need to take advantage of the career momentum he has right now and maneuver him into a significant middleweight (or super middleweight) match (and, yeah, hopefully within the next six-nine months). Chris Eubank Jr. is out there (running his mouth on Twitter), Hassan Ndam is the WBA’s No. 1 contender (so if Danny were to beat the veteran, he’d position himself for a rematch with GGG), there’s David Lemieux, Ryota Murata, Rob Brant, Willie Monroe Jr., and Sergey Derevyanchenko. There are legit contenders and solid up-and-comers for Jacobs to fight.

Can we please get more PPVs available online? Of course. That’s the plan!

The ringtv.com stream had some hiccups at first, but by the middle of the Cuadras fight the stream was smooth and clear, and the international broadcast team did a good job. Dave Bontempo and Kevin Kelley are veterans and they know what they’re looking at. I’m glad you appreciated them and I’m glad the hiccups were gone by the time the co-featured bouts began. That’s something we’ll have to improve on for the next online PPV.

Boxing needs to get with the times. Agreed, and I believe that it is. You’ll see that by the end of 2017.

The next step is a great app, like the UFC one, that offers an all boxing sub service along with PPV, and to get as many promoters on it as you can. That’s in the works, my man.

I’d gladly pay for access to non PPV cards, big and small, and the ability to buy legit PPV’s without getting raped by the cable company. We’re counting on fans like you.

Get your ringtv nerds working on that ASAP. My nerds are on it.

Will the Canelo-Chavez fight be available online at least? Of course it will, just as his last two pay-per-view shows (vs. Amir Khan and Liam Smith) were.

Email Fischer at dougie@boxingmailbag.com. Follow him on Twitter at @dougiefischer

The post Dougie’s Monday mailbag appeared first on The Ring.

Source:: The Ring – Boxing