Cris Cyborg breaks silence on Angela Magana incident

By Guilherme Cruz

Cris Cyborg has finally opened up after the altercation that took place on Sunday.

The Brazilian featherweight confronted fellow UFC fighter Angela Magana at the UFC Athlete Retreat in Las Vegas, upset with tweets the strawweight fighter posted about her recently, and landed a punch on Magana’s face.

Cyborg will not be arrested, but is being cited for misdemeanor battery by the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department.

On a lengthy post on Facebook, Cyborg threw shots at UFC president Dana White and commentator Joe Rogan for controversial comments they have made in the past, and talked about being respected by co-workers.

Only 1 day to vote on #yourmajesty poll in previous tweet. Its anonymous you pussies. Who wore it better? Please see previous tweet to vote pic.twitter.com/ivLD7HD7vk

— Angela Magana (@AngelaMagana1) April 27, 2017

“When disparaging comments are made at the top, it sets an example that it is acceptable within the company,” Cyborg wrote, “allowing lower ranking individuals to continuing following examples of leaders, establishing the culture and practices of the company. It is no secret I have been a victim of online bullying.”

“At times in my career it has felt like their has been a team of writers using the internet to shape the public’s vision of my company’s brand, often attempting to make me look like the face of anabolic abuse in the sport of MMA,” she continued. “While it has been years since someone has said I looked like ‘Wanderlia [sic] Silva in a dress’, it doesn’t feel that long ago that I was listening to someone give me advice on how cutting off my dick would help me to make 135 pounds easier.

“When people see these actions of people high profile in the company being promoted through social media without consequence or even a public apology, they see it as an acceptable behavior within the company, and often view it as an encouraged opportunity at self promotion. It should never be acceptable for a company to allow their employees to develop a culture where sexual harassment, racial prejudices, or female discrimination are acceptable in the work place.”

Read Cyborg’s full statement below.

Dear Cyborg Nation,

I looked the word Culture up in the dictionary and it said “The social behavior and norms found in human societies” which made me start to think of all the different cultures I have had shape my views and how those experiences have sculpted my understanding of life and relationships, and it made me want to share my thoughts with those on Cyborg Nation.

Core Values of Culture are learned through those in leadership roles in the communities we live, work, and regularly interact with. When I first started training at Chute Boxe in Curitiba I learned the true spirit of fighting watching legends like Wanderlia Silva [sic], Shogun, and Cyborg train everyday in the gym. Everyone looked at these fighters as an example, we saw the hard work, heart, and dedication it took to become a World Champion and we learned not to expect anything less from ourselves. Training amongst these legends of the sport we learned how to win with pride, and if a loss happened to deal with it with integrity. Even though I am not training with Rudimar Fredrigo [sic] and the Chute Boxe team in Curitiba, I think I still represent the culture of the team and the values we place in honor, respect, and discipline which is why I have proudly flown the #CHUTEBOXE flag my entire career.

The way we select friends is often very different than the way companies select which ones to build long term working relationships with. The success of any company merger relies on the ability of the owners to merge core values of the two companies, giving special emphasis to the development of communication that can result in a positive conflict resolution whenever problems or misunderstandings occur.

Similar to my time in the gym with Chute Boxe I have learned that just like in fighting, culture in business is developed by those seen successful and high profile within the company. Examples of leadership are learned from the top down, and this results in what eventually becomes the culture of the company, and the identity of their relationships, and their associates.

When disparaging comments are made at the top, it sets an example that it is acceptable within the company, allowing lower ranking individuals to continuing following examples of leaders, establishing the culture and practices of the company. It is no secret I have been a victim of online bullying. At times in my career it has felt like their has been a team of writers using the internet to shape the public’s vision of my company’s brand, often attempting to make me look like the face of anabolic abuse in the sport of MMA. While it has been years since someone has said I looked like “Wanderlia [sic] Silva in a dress”, it doesn’t feel that long ago that I was listening to someone give me advice on how cutting off my dick would help me to make 135lbs easier. When people see these actions of people high profile in the company being promoted through social media without consequence or even a public apology, they see it as an acceptable behavior within the company, and often view it as an encouraged opportunity at self promotion. It should never be acceptable for a company to allow their employees to develop a culture where sexual harassment, racial prejudices, or female discrimination are acceptable in the work place.

When two companies work together, it is not only money, but the relationships within those companies, that establish the value, length, and success of the partnerships. Feeling welcomed, respected, and having trust that the two companies are mutually beneficial and seeking the same goals is essential for any success in a long term commitment. While profitability is important it can not be the only factor when determining a merger of two companies because for what is a man profited, if he shall gain the whole world, and lose his own soul? or what shall a man give in exchange for his soul?

For me it is simple to see the things I value. I am a family girl from Brazil who is not impressed by the lights of the show and the sound of the radio. While I do place some value in money I also know the joys of working for a company that values respect, loyalty, and honesty amongst its associates and discourages a workplace where sexual harassment, racial prejudices, and discrimination against females fighters is acceptable promotion.

Love,

Cris Cyborg

Source:: MMA Fighting

Monday Morning Analyst: Rory MacDonald’s brilliant Bellator debut

By Luke Thomas

On this episode of the podcast, we go over Rory MacDonald’s spectacular Bellator debut at Bellator 179 against Paul Daley. We’ll also take a look at the top performances from Invicta 23 and more. This is the Monday Morning Analyst.

Source:: MMA Fighting

Jessica Eye on TUF 25 Finale: ‘I’m Basically Fighting For my Job’

By Fernando Quiles Jr. Jessica Eye knows her spot on the Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) roster is in jeopardy. Eye will battle Aspen Ladd inside the T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas, Nevada on July 7. It’ll be Eye’s chance to snap her four-fight skid. “Evil” hasn’t won a bout since Nov. 2014. During a recent appearance on MMA Junkie […]

Source:: MMA News

Terence Crawford, Gary Russell Jr., Gervonta Davis sparkle: Weekend Review

By Michael Rosenthal

The past weekend had a little bit of everything – impressive performances from special fighters, strong statements from rising stars, crazy knockouts, controversial cards and a rogue handler who punched the opponent of his boxer.

Here are the biggest winners and losers of the weekend.

BIGGEST WINNER

Terence Crawford: Vasyl Lomachenko made a pretty good opponent in Jason Sosa look foolish last month before stopping him in nine rounds, which enhanced his reputation as a pound-for-pound destroyer.

On Saturday, it was Crawford’s turn.

“Bud” painted another masterpiece on what typically becomes his personal canvas, outboxing, outpunching and ultimately breaking down 2008 Olympic gold medalist Felix Diaz on Saturday at Madison Square Garden in New York City.

Diaz (19-2, 9 knockouts) was a hopeless, battered mess when his corner mercifully stopped the fight after 10 rounds.

The Dominican isn’t a great professional but under normal circumstances he should be very difficult to beat, given his background. And Crawford (31-0, 22 KOs) made him look as if he were an amateur again, further evidence of how special the RING junior welterweight champion is.

Crawford, 29, seems to be getting better and better.

The only thing missing at this point is a defining victory, his best so far probably being his onesided decision over Viktor Postol last July. That’s why many people hope Manny Pacquiao agrees to face him. Pacman isn’t the fighter he once was but he’s still damn good — light years better than Postol.

I think it would be a tough fight for Crawford but probably one he’d win, which would give him a leg up on Lomachenko, who doesn’t have a victory of that caliber. If not Pacquiao, then there are other big names – Keith Thurman? – at 147 pounds that could determine how big Crawford gets.

I have no idea how this pound-for-pound drama will end. Will it be Lomachenko who ends up at No. 1? Will it be Crawford? Mikey Garcia? Errol Spence? Someone else? Maybe they’ll all rotate depending on circumstances.

All anyone knows at the moment is that the race to the top is fascinating.

NEXT BIGGEST WINNERS

Gary Russell Jr. and Gervonta Davis: Russell underscored what we already know about him while Davis made a strong statement that he could soon join the handful of truly elite boxers worldwide.

One thing I liked about Russell’s performance against Oscar Escandon (25-3, 17 KOs) is that Russell beat the durable Colombian at his own game, outfighting him on the inside – where he landed almost at will – en route to a seventh-round stoppage Saturday in Oxon Hill, Maryland.

Outside, inside, somewhere in the middle, it’s next to impossible to beat the quick-handed and tough Russell (28-1, 17 KOs).

His problem has been inactivity. Before the Escandon fight, he hadn’t been in the ring for 13 months. And before that it was a year. A fighter can’t build momentum with that kind of schedule, even one as good as Russell.

And, more important, he needs to lure a big-name opponent into the ring. That also has been difficult. Russell hit a peak when he stopped Jhonny Gonzalez in March 2015 but followed that with victories over solid, but limited foes in Patrick Hyland and now Escandon over those two years.

Russell needs to take part in a meaningful event to begin realizing his potential.

Davis (18-0, 17 KOs) is looking more and more as if he’s made of star material. The protégé of Floyd Mayweather Jr. traveled to the home country (England) of then-unbeaten Liam Walsh and stopped him in the third round.

The IBF junior lightweight titleholder hurt Walsh (21-1, 14 KOs) with a left hook and then clubbed him to the canvas. Walsh got up but, after a few more punches, the slaughter was ended by the referee. It was Davis’ ninth consecutive KO.

Davis has the ability to overwhelm opponents – and impress fans – with his speed, power and aggression. I have a feeling that won’t change as his opposition continues to get better.

BIGGEST LOSER

Leon Lawson Jr.: No doubt about this one. I believe Dirrell’s uncle and assistant trainer will end up as the biggest loser of the year.

Lawson was enraged that Jose Uzcategui punched his nephew Andre Dirrell after the bell to end Round 8 on the Russell-Escandon card, rendering Dirrell unable to continue. Lawson obviously felt protective of someone he loves.

I get it.

The problem was where Lawson took that rage. He cracked an unsuspecting Uzcategui on the jaw as the Venezuelan fighter stood in his corner after he was disqualified, creating a combustible situation in the ring that could’ve ended with serious injuries.

Uzcategui took the shot like a champ and didn’t punch back but the damage was done, to Lawson at least. He was wanted on assault charges at the time this was written and could spend time in prison. I don’t advocate a substantial sentence. It was a crime of passion, after all. Uzcategui was more surprised than injured. And, for what it’s worth, Dirrell apologized for his uncle.

Lawson should be punished, though. If that wasn’t assault, I don’t know what is. Uzcategui was defenseless at the time he was struck. Lawson also damaged a sport that is constantly fighting to defend its reputation, which hopefully will add a suspension to any jail time Lawson does.

And, finally, Lawson should simply be ashamed of the manner in which he attacked Uzcategui. It was cowardly. Sucker punches always are.

RABBIT PUNCHES

Another reason Lawson’s assault on Uzcategui was unnecessary is that his guy won. The DQ gave Dirrell (26-2, 16 KOs) what the IBF calls its “interim” super middleweight title, which appears to set up a rematch with unified titleholder James DeGale. Dirrell failed in his two previous title shots, losing decisions to Carl Froch in 2009 and DeGale in 2015. Can he beat DeGale? Possibly. I think he demonstrated against Uzcategui that he retains at 33 much of his ability and athleticism. He can give anyone at least some trouble. I’d pick the Englishman to win, though. He’s the hotter, fresher guy. … Uzcategui (25-2, 22 KOs) can blame only himself for his disqualification. He punched Dirrell after the bell at the close of Round 1, was warned and then did it again after Round 8. That’s unfortunate for him. He fought well and with great energy, which gave him a lead on two cards when the fight was stopped. He’ll be back. … No knockout over the weekend was as striking as that delivered by Ray Beltran, who sent Jonathan Maicelo (25-3, 12 KOs) to the hospital with a single left hook in the second round on the Crawford-Diaz card. Maicelo was doing some nice work when, BAM!, the punch instantly rendered him unconscious and his head hit the canvas with great force. Beltran (33-7-1, 21 KOs) could be the biggest winner here. The youngish 35-year-old is now the mandatory challenger to IBF 135-pound titleholder Robert Easter and the victory reportedly enhanced his chances of gaining his green card, which would allow him to stay in the U.S. He was asked immediately after his KO what that would mean to him and his family and he fought back tears. Good night’s work. …

David Benavidez’s knockout of Rogelio Medina (37-8, 31 KOs) on Saturday in Laredo, Texas, wasn’t as quick as Beltran’s but it too was brutal. The super middleweight contender put Medina down in each of the last three rounds, finishing the job by pounding Medina to the canvas in the eighth. Medina couldn’t go on. Benavidez (18-0, 17 KOs) would appear to have all the tools he’ll need to become a star – skills, power, a killer instinct – and he’s a baby at 20 years old, which means his best is almost certainly in front of him. … The decision in the Hassan N’DamRyota Murata middleweight fight Saturday in Tokyo was curious. Most observers thought Murata, fighting in a card staged by his promoter in his home town, deserved the nod but it was N’Dam who emerged with a split-decision victory and the WBA’s bogus “regular” title. One judge, Gustavo Padilla of Panama, gave N’Dam nine rounds. WBA President Gilberto Mendoza said he was embarrassed by the decision and ordered an immediate rematch. Let’s hope it happens for Murata’s sake. That’s a tough way to lose your first fight. … Not sure what to make of Rances Barthelemy. The talented Cuban defector has held titles in two divisions but has yet to break through as anything resembling a star. Barthelemey (26-0, 13 KOs) defeated Kiryl Relikh (21-2, 19 KOs) by a unanimous decision on the Russell-Escandon card but many believe Relikh deserved to win. And, for Barthelemy, that followed a so-so performance against Mickey Bey in June of last year. Something is missing. …

One more KO worth checking out: Milan Melindo (36-2, 13 KOs) stopped veteran Akira Yaegashi (25-6, 13 KOs) in only 2 minutes, 45 seconds to win the IBF flyweight title Sunday in Tokyo. Melindo put Yaegashi down with a left hook and then, moments later, finished the job with a straight right. It was the biggest victory of the Filipino’s career. … And, finally, Diego De La Hoya (18-0, 9 KOs) gave a solid performance in outpointing Erik Ruiz (16-7-1, 6 KOs) on Thursday in Tucson, Arizona. De La Hoya seems to have the tools and backing to have some success. We’ll see when he steps in in opposition.

The post Terence Crawford, Gary Russell Jr., Gervonta Davis sparkle: Weekend Review appeared first on The Ring.

Source:: The Ring – Boxing

Michael Page Says He’s Lost a ‘Hell of a Lot of Respect’ For Paul Daley

By Fernando Quiles Jr. Michael Page isn’t fond of Paul Daley’s actions after his Bellator 179 bout this past Friday night (May 19). Daley took on Rory MacDonald inside the SSE Arena, Wembley in London, England. “Semtex” lost the fight via second-round submission. After the bout, Daley went into the crowd and charged at Page. At one time, Page […]

Source:: MMA News

Full Report: N’Dam wins vacant WBA 160lb belt by controversial decision over 2012 Olympic Gold Medalist Murata

By Togorashi

By Joe Koizumi
Photos by Naoki Fukuda

Cameroon-born Frenchman Hassan N’Dam N’Jikam (36-2, 21 KOs), 159.5, barely acquired the vacant WBA middleweight belt as he was awarded a controversial split decision over previously undefeated 2012 Olympic gold medalist Ryota Murata (12-1, 9 KOs), 159.5, over twelve rounds on Saturday in Tokyo, Japan. The official tallies were as follows: Gustavo Padilla (Panama) 116-111, Hubert Earl (Canada) 115-112, both for N’Dam, and Raul Caiz Sr. (US) 117-110 for Murata. The referee was Luis Pabon (Puerto Rico).

Murata connected with a beautiful right counter, dropping N’Dam to the deck in the closing seconds of the fourth round. N’Dam kept moving to-and-fro to avert Murata’s stronger punches, though occasionally losing his equilibrium.

After the completion of the contest, all the audience, as well as nationwide TV watchers, believed in Murata’s coronation, but their hot expectations turned into bitter disappointment. Murata looked more a winner than a loser to the eyes of the crowd that was greatly embarrassed at the verdict.

Murata, two years his junior ta 31, was a taller boxer by an inch and adopted an Arthur Abraham peek-a-boo style to nullify N’Dam’s busy shots with his gloves and arms almost completely, as he said after the bout, “No punches of N’Dam hurt me at all.” It seemed true, but the Frenchman threw seemingly some twice as many punches as Murata who averted almost all of them with his high and tight guard.

Hassan made a good start with busier combinations to Murata’s guard, while the Japanese prospect cautiously felt out his mobility and hand speed as well by blocking all of them in the first three rounds. Murata only sporadically threw solid left-right combos to the fleet-footed N’Dam.

At 2:30 of the fourth, Murata exploded a vicious countering right to the face of Hassan, who fell down and regained his feet–as he had tasted six knockdowns in his fight with Peter Quillin in 2012 and four visits to the deck in his David Lemieux bout in 2015. As he did, N’Dam displayed a remarkable recuperative power and kept riding a fast bicycle used for Tour de France that he would not absorb Murata’s powerful shot again.

The ex-Olympic gold medalist was in command in the fourth through seventh rounds with his strong pressure, and had him staggering to the ropes with a heavy left-light combo in the fifth and sixth sessions.

The seventh saw Hassan’s bicycle slip down twice with Murata’s constant pressure, but it might be true Murata had a difficulty catching up with such an incessantly moving target.

We saw the ninth and tenth rounds very close and hard to score since N’Dam kept moving around with Murata occasionally throwing jabs and one-two combinations to the Fancy Dan.

It was surprising that N’Dam, despite his absorption of Murata’s sporadic but stronger shots, maintained his speed on hand and foot even in the championship rounds, and proved he remained a really elusive target.

The newly crowned champ Hassan said, “I thought I won, but wasn’t sure as it isn’t my home turf but Murata’s. I took a few strong shots of Murata in every round, while I think I threw more jabs and combinations to him. Murata’s right hand was truly strong, but he replied on his right shot too much and wasn’t a complete boxer. But he is so much talented, and will become world champ in the future.”

The dejected loser Murata reviewed the fight, saying, “Of course, I thought I won. But I should have hit more punches to drop N’Dam once or twice more to clearly win. I feel sorry not to be able to win, but I could enjoy fighting in the world title bout, which became a great experience to me.”

All the newspapers here in Japan wondered the disputed decision since Murata was such a highly expected athlete who people strongly expected his success both in the amateur and professional fields and Murata drew the whole nation’s earnest attentions. The papers discussed which is more essential—effective punches or number of punches, that is, who the winner was—N’Dam or Murata.

There’s no use to cry over spilt split decision. There will be only a way to solve the controversy, which must be a rematch of the competitive rivals. Murata definitely deserves a grudge fight.

Promoter: Teiken Promotions.
WBA supervisor: Julio Thyme (Panama).

[See image gallery at www.fightnews.com]

The post Full Report: N’Dam wins vacant WBA 160lb belt by controversial decision over 2012 Olympic Gold Medalist Murata appeared first on Boxing News.

Source:: Fightnews.com

Broadway Boxing back at Foxwoods June 3

By Togorashi

On Saturday, June 3, DiBella Entertainment will return to the Fox Theater at Foxwoods Resort Casino, in Mashantucket, CT, for the latest exciting installment of its popular Broadway Boxing series, presented by Nissan of Queens, Azad Watches, OPTYX, and Christos Steak House. The card will feature a bevy of New England talent, including fan favorite Shelly “Shelito’s Way” Vincent (19-1, 1 KO) in an eight-round special attraction featherweight bout, as well as lightweight Matt Remillard (24-1, 13 KOs) on the comeback and welterweight prospect Mykquan Williams (6-0, 4 KOs) on the rise.

The post Broadway Boxing back at Foxwoods June 3 appeared first on Boxing News.

Source:: Fightnews.com